“It was Christianity that had provided the colonized and the enslaved with their surest voice”

“Repeatedly, whether crashing along the canals of Tenochtitlan, or settling the estuaries of Massachusetts, or trekking deep into the Transvaal, the confidence that had enabled Europeans to believe themselves superior to those they were displacing was derived from Christianity. Repeatedly, though, in the struggle to hold this arrogance to account, it was Christianity that had provided the colonized and the enslaved with their surest voice. The paradox was profound. No other conquerors, carving out empires for themselves, had done so as the servants of a man tortured to death on the orders of a colonial official. No other conquerors, dismissing with contempt the gods of other peoples, had installed in their place and emblem of power so deeply ambivalent as to render problematic the very notion of power. No other conquerors, exporting an understanding of the divine peculiar to themselves, had so successfully persuaded peoples around the globe that it possessed a universal import.”

Tom Holland, Dominion: How the Christian Revolution Remade the World (Page 504).

Read this book.

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  1. […] How the Christian Revolution Remade the World. I highly recommend this one. I quoted an excerpt here. If you want a more thorough review before deciding on the book, read Tim Keller’s thoughts […]